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Pawesome event has big impact on students

The Curtin Marketing team are always developing innovative ways to engage with high-achieving potential future students of the university, while offering them a taste of the unique Curtin experience.

The team from the Curtin PUPS (People Under Pressure at School) project recently surprised Year 12 students at St Hilda’s Anglican School for Girls after they had received their exam results, offering them a novel way to unwind in the post-exam period.

Year 12 students from St Hilda's Anglican School for girls were surprised with six week old puppies.
Year 12 students from St Hilda's Anglican School for girls were surprised with six week old puppies.

“The aim of the project was to engage with high-achieving students and to help de-stress year 12 students, as it is one of the most demanding years in terms of exams, study, sport, social and family commitments, not to mention making decisions about your future,” said Curtin PUPS Project Sponsor and Chief Marketing Officer, Ty Hayes.

“We know that playing with pups can elevate levels of serotonin and dopamine, which can calm and relax, and we saw plenty of this today,” he said.

Twelve six week old puppies attended the event, along with Curtin’s popular therapy dog, George Bode, who joined the fun with his owner, Associate Professor Shirley Bode. Curtin PUPS partnered with not-for profit SAFE Perth (Saving Animals from Euthanasia), who generously provided the puppies and spoke to the students about how they could give back to the community and adopt a furry friend, or volunteer at the SAFE Perth shelter and support a worthy cause.

Curtin’s popular therapy dog, George Bode, joined the fun with his owner, Associate Professor Shirley Bode.
Curtin’s popular therapy dog, George Bode, joined the fun with his owner, Associate Professor Shirley Bode.
SAFE Perth provided the puppies and spoke to the girls about giving back.
SAFE Perth provided the puppies and spoke to the girls about giving back.

Ms Jane Putigny, St Hilda’s Head of Year 12, said the visit was a huge success.

“There was an overwhelmingly positive response from the girls,” Ms Putigny said.

“They couldn’t stop laughing and squealing at the cuteness of the puppies! Many of the girls told us that they didn’t want the session to end, however they have hundreds of selfies to remember the day.”

George Bode, Curtin's therapy dog, was a popular guest at the event.
George Bode, Curtin's therapy dog, was a popular guest at the event.
Playing with puppies can elevate levels of the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine, which calm and relax.
Playing with puppies can elevate levels of the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine, which calm and relax.

Curtin’s future students’ team and student ambassadors also attended the event to speak with the girls about the importance of mindfulness, and how it can help them to manage challenging or potentially stressful situations. They also answered any questions the girls had about their future careers and the courses on offer at Curtin.

Attracting high-achieving students to Curtin is a strategic priority for the University and for the Faculty of Health Sciences. St Hilda’s was the first school the PUPS team have engaged with, with more schools slated for visits soon.

A video from the event can be viewed here and photos can be seen here.