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New research delivers a 50% reduction in skin tears

[Posted: 9 December 2013]

Research carried out by Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre (WMI CRC) in Western Australia has shown that the number of skin tears in older people can be cut in half simply by moisturising twice a day.

By translating these findings into aged care facilities and also the community, this internationally recognised research, has the potential for significant impact amongst ageing Australians.

“It will result in improved quality of life, reduced incidence of chronic wounds and lower costs,” said Professor Keryln Carville, Professor of Primary Healthcare and Community Nursing at Curtin University and Silver Chain.

A team of recognised experts in wound management comprising Professor Keryln Carville, Professor Fiona Wood, plastic surgeon and ‘Spray-on-Skin’ pioneer and Professor Helen Edwards, Assistant Dean from Queensland University of Technology, will discuss the results of the study and the national impact of wounds at a special event to be held at Parliament House in Canberra.

Professor Carville said skin tears are the most common preventable wound found in older adults.

“As we age our skin gets thinner, dryer and more fragile, tears easily and heals more slowly,” Professor Carville said.

“Skin tears can often lead to wounds such as leg ulcers, which are very painful and debilitating and can persist for many years.

“WMI CRC’s research demonstrates that by moisturising just twice a day we can actually prevent traumatic wounds from developing in the first place.

“With over 430,000 Australians affected by chronic wounds like skin tears, and the cost to the healthcare system being around $2.6 billion a year, this simple regime can really make a difference.”

‘Saving our Skin: The Economic Impact of Skin Health’ event will be held in The Mural Hall, Parliament House from 2:00pm to 3:30pm on Monday, 9 December 2013.

For more information please contact Dr Ian Griffiths at WMI CRC on (07) 3138 4882, or visit woundcrc.com.