About PRECRU

PRECRU is based in the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Curtin University. It is a collaborative research endeavour with St John Ambulance (Western Australia).

st john ambulance logo on shirt

St John Ambulance (WA) is the sole provider of emergency ambulance service for the state of Western Australia. The service covers an area of 2.6 million square kilometres serving a population of approximately 2.6 million people. It is the largest area covered by a single ambulance service anywhere in the world.

PRECRU is made up of a team of researchers, under the direction of Professor Judith Finn, who have come together to promote and conduct clinical research to improve outcomes for prehospital resuscitation and emergency care patients.

The focus on prehospital and early hospitalisation interventions recognises the critical importance of early intervention to improve patient outcomes. Through collaborative partnerships, PRECRU aims to promote the rapid translation of promising scientific and clinical advances to improve patient care.

Several of the PRECRU researchers are affiliated with the Australian Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (Aus-ROC), a Centre for Research Excellence funded by the NHMRC.


Mission

The PRECRU mission is to promote excellence in evidence-based prehospital emergency care through the conduct of high quality clinical, epidemiological and health services research, and encourage the translation of research into practice.

Values

The PRECRU team values responsibility, integrity, accountability, collegiality and respect in all of our collaborative and professional relationships as well as innovation and intellectual development of scientific thought. We aim to achieve excellence in every aspect of our research.

Objectives

PRECRU objectives are to:

  1. conduct high quality research that will build the evidence-base that informs prehospital patient care practice and the development of high quality emergency medical services systems;
  2. build research capacity in the field of prehospital emergency care, both within Western Australia and more widely, through collaboration with other national and international prehospital and emergency care researchers; and
  3. promote understanding by clinicians and the public of the importance of prehospital and emergency care clinical practice being based on sound research evidence.