Frequently asked questions

Please see the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery application requirements for more detailed information regarding admission criteria, requirements and eligibility, or contact Curtin Connect on 1300 222 888 or complete the form at this link.

Frequently asked questions about Curtin's Medicine course

What is the difference between a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) and a Doctor of Medicine (MD)?

The MD is usually a postgraduate medicine course that is completed over 4 years. You will need to have obtained a Bachelor degree prior to applying for entry into an MD. You are not studying medicine for the entire 7 years, but instead are completing 3 years of another degree prior to entry.

The MBBS is an undergraduate medicine course that is completed over 5 years. You can apply for entry straight from school. In this course you study medicine over 5 years.

Upon completion of both courses, MBBS graduates and MD graduates are eligible to access an internship at a hospital.

What are the specific WACE subjects required for entry into Curtin’s medical course?

Chemistry ATAR is the only essential WACE subject that is required to be successfully completed in order to be eligible to apply.

How are offers for interview determined?

Interview offers are determined through a combination of UCAT score and predicted/actual ATAR. The score is based on 60% predicted or actual ATAR and 40% UCAT score.

What is the UCAT requirement? Is there any minimum criteria?

There is no minimum UCAT score requirement. All applicants are required to sit the UCAT, the UCAT score will then be combined with an applicants ATAR or predicted ATAR to rank for interview.

How is the UCAT assessed?

The UCAT ANZ is assessed in five different sections. For further information on each section please see https://www.ucat.edu.au/ucat-anz/test-format/

Will there be interviews directly after UCAT scores are out?

No, interviews are traditionally run in late November for local applicants and in mid-January the next year for interstate and competitive local applicants. UCAT ANZ scores are scheduled to release in September.

What are the dates for MMIs for the 2021 intake?

Dates for our 2021 intake interviews have not been finalised. Interviews are usually scheduled in late November for local applicants and mid-January the next year for interstate and competitive local applicants.

Is there a minimum qualifying score for EACH SECTION of the UCAT to be considered, or is it just whatever the total UCAT score is then it is combined with the ATAR for ranking for interview?

There is no minimum score for each section of the UCAT ANZ. An applicant’s total UCAT ANZ score will be combined with their ATAR to rank them for interview.

Is the minimum ATAR of 95 inclusive of adjustment factors (bonus points) or is it raw score?

The minimum ATAR of 95 is inclusive of adjustment factors.

Do you have to maintain a certain standard of marks (GPA/average) over the 5 years of studying?

In order to successfully progress through the course students are required to successfully pass each unit in the course. Students are also required to meet professional behaviour requirements to progress through the course. Further information on professional behaviour requirements can be found here

What do we do if we don’t get one of the 100 places offered?

You can consider reapplying the following year depending on the results that you have achieved. Please see our current year admissions guide here- https://study.curtin.edu.au/applying/application-requirements/medicine/

Will the Curtin Medical School be offering Bonded Medical Places?

The Curtin Medical School will be offering Bonded Medical Places (BMP).

Approximately 28% of Commonwealth Supported Places (CSP) in university medical programs across Australia must be set aside for the Federal Government’s Bonded Medical Places (BMP) scheme. The BMP provides students a Commonwealth supported medical place at an Australian university in return for a commitment to work in regional, rural and remote areas for a specified period, at the completion of their training. An area of medical need will be a district of workforce shortage as defined by the Australian Federal Government.

Do I need to apply for a Bonded Medical Place?

No, you do not need to specifically apply for a Bonded Medical Place. By submitting an application for Medicine at Curtin, you will be considered for either a non-bonded or Bonded Medical Place, provided that you’re a competitive applicant in the final offer ranking.
Please note that New Zealand citizens are not eligible to receive a Bonded Medical Place.

How do I apply and when do applications open?

All applicants are required to apply through the Tertiary Institutions Service Centre (TISC) with the exception of those applying through the Curtin Centre for Aboriginal Studies (CAS).

There are two distinct parts to the application process:

  1. An application to sit the UCAT ANZ: Applicants must register to sit the University Clinical Aptitude Test ANZ (UCAT ANZ) before the application closing date on 11 May 2020.

Applicants are responsible for making their own arrangements to register for the UCAT ANZ. Please refer to the UCAT ANZ website, which explains the test in detail and sets out the procedures for registration including the fees payable, test centre procedures and regulations.

  1. TISC application: Applicants who have registered to sit the UCAT ANZ must apply to TISC. TISC applications open at the beginning of August and close at the end of September each year. Applicants are responsible for checking the specific deadlines which are available on the TISC website. Applicants will be asked to enter their UCAT ANZ identification number when they lodge their application on the TISC website.

Please see the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery application requirements for more detailed information regarding admission criteria, requirements and eligibility.

Where do I find more information?

Please visit our website for more detailed information on admission requirements and a link to the Admissions Guide which contains information about admission criteria, requirements and eligibility. It is imperative that applicants familiarise themselves with the guide to ensure they understand the requirements of the admission and application process.

Please see the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery application requirements for more detailed information regarding admission criteria, requirements and eligibility.

Who can apply?

Please see the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery application requirements for more detailed information regarding admission criteria, requirements and eligibility.

What are the entry requirements?

Please see the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery application requirements for more detailed information regarding admission criteria, requirements and eligibility.

Will there be any places offered to students from equity, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander or rural backgrounds?

Places will be prioritised for students from rural and regional areas, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds and students who have experienced long-term educational disadvantage. These students will receive additional weighting in the admission process in recognition of the historical and current disadvantage experienced by people from these groups accessing higher education.

How will the medical degree be structured?

In the first year of the course, students will undertake interprofessional units designed to promote collaborative practice and learning opportunities with other health sciences students. In addition, students will be introduced to problem-based learning in discipline-specific units in medicine and participate in structured activities taking students into the community with a variety of health professionals.

The second and third years will include intensive study of the structure and function of the human body in health and disease, using a problem-based learning approach.  Clinical placement links established in the first year of study will be maintained and interprofessional practice will continue.

In the fourth year there will be a major transition from the University campus into the clinical setting.  Students will be offered a variety of clinical experiences including placements in outer metropolitan, rural and regional locations, in both community and hospital settings.

In the fifth and final year of study, students will work entirely in clinical settings as members of the healthcare team.  The training in the clinical settings will be intensive and in a range of different environments to prepare students for their internship.